City Permits for Sharing Services

Three startups in San Francisco raised more the $200 million for their electric scooter sharing product. This new San Francisco trend, that allows you, with your phone, to scan a bike, take a ride and leave it for the next to use wherever you want. The latter has not only sparked complaints by citizens annoyed by scooters left on the pavement, it has come to the city attorney issuing a cease-and-desist order to the startups. The scooter and bike sharing programmes without docks and dedicated parking spaces have led globally to discussions on the regulations related to sharing of private sector products in public spaces. Although the intentions and impacts of bikes and electric scooters for short rides in cities should be encouraged, regulations and permits for operators in cities should be respected. Scootergate in San Francisco is exemplary for many challenges that cities face when going Smart. Implementation of Smart City technology even frivolous ones like electric scooters requires Smart regulations and well thought-through partnerships. Per region globally the way public space is being used and managed is very different and as such requires tailored approaches to regulations and public-private partnerships.

Sources and links:
https://www.sfchronicle.com/opinion/openforum/article/San-Francisco-has-no-interest-in-banning-electric-12849134.php
http://www.businessinsider.com/electric-scooter-startup-war-in-san-francisco-2018-4
https://techcrunch.com/2018/04/16/electric-scooters-are-getting-closer-to-regulation-in-sf
Picture: San Francisco, GPS, Creative Commons

Smart City Strategies

Future Cities Catapult has released their first global review of smart city strategies at the Smart City Expo World Congress in Barcelona. The report looks at 21 smart city strategies from around the world including New York, Berlin, Sao Paulo and Manchester.|

The publication will give city leaders insights into how they can begin their smart city journey. This Global Review charts the evolution in smart city strategies from technology-driven towards citizen-centred. It highlights the challenges in creating collaborative citizen-led strategies that can cope with a new wave of digital disruption as evidenced by apps such as Uber and Airbnb.
The review makes the following five recommendations for city governments:

  1. Establish strong leadership to develop skills and capacity within local government to initiate and deliver at-scale smart city projects.
  2. Embed your smart city strategy within existing statutory frameworks in order to ensure the strategy’s implementation and funding.
  3. When creating your smart city strategy, consider a collaborative approach, coupled with strong political support, to ensure that you harness your citizens’ and businesses’ capabilities and respond to their needs.
  4. Tap into core city funding by regularly scanning your existing city assets and budgets in order to leverage these for smart city projects.
  5. Create a plan for private sector engagement and long-term collaboration, as well as a designated person or team for communicating with businesses and investors.
    Picture: Geneva, Rogier van den Berg